prepaidafrica:

Africa’s Technological Potential: The Next Frontier?
Change is happening in Africa. The continent is booming economically and financially, with a growth rate expected to hit 5.6% in 2013, according to World Bank numbers. The mobile sector alone represented 6,3% of the sub-Saharan African GDP in 2012, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.As the continent slowly aligns itself with the international trail of new technology and digital innovations, it has caught the eye of big names in the industry. Google, Microsoft and IBM are among the biggest names currently launching research centers and initiatives ‘for’ Africa. Consequently, several smaller African organizations tap from these giants to build and enhance their capacities.
The growing African tech scene also daily catches the attention of smaller teams of technology specialists and enthusiasts whose interest in Africa often leads them into adventurous explorations. One of such is AfricaHackTrip. It is a team of European tech enthusiasts who conducted a 5-week journey to survey the East African tech world. The team stopped in Kampala, Kigali, Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, four of Africa’s top ‘iHubs’. The reception of the project was positive in all four locations the AHT team has visited. In Kampala, they visited KampaBits, a school teaching underprivileged youths web design, print design and web development and the students were more than grateful for the ideas and encouragement the AHT team brought to them.
(Africa’s Technological Potential: The Next Frontier? via ising.globalvoicesonline.org)

Tech future in Africa

prepaidafrica:

Africa’s Technological Potential: The Next Frontier?

Change is happening in Africa. The continent is booming economically and financially, with a growth rate expected to hit 5.6% in 2013, according to World Bank numbers. The mobile sector alone represented 6,3% of the sub-Saharan African GDP in 2012, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.As the continent slowly aligns itself with the international trail of new technology and digital innovations, it has caught the eye of big names in the industry. Google, Microsoft and IBM are among the biggest names currently launching research centers and initiatives ‘for’ Africa. Consequently, several smaller African organizations tap from these giants to build and enhance their capacities.

The growing African tech scene also daily catches the attention of smaller teams of technology specialists and enthusiasts whose interest in Africa often leads them into adventurous explorations. One of such is AfricaHackTrip. It is a team of European tech enthusiasts who conducted a 5-week journey to survey the East African tech world. The team stopped in Kampala, Kigali, Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, four of Africa’s top ‘iHubs’. The reception of the project was positive in all four locations the AHT team has visited. In Kampala, they visited KampaBits, a school teaching underprivileged youths web design, print design and web development and the students were more than grateful for the ideas and encouragement the AHT team brought to them.

(Africa’s Technological Potential: The Next Frontier? via ising.globalvoicesonline.org)

Tech future in Africa

futuretechreport:

Unlock Your Car, Smartphone and More with Your Heart

The Nymi uses your unique ECG to authenticate you through a wristband that is then bluetooth connected to devices and applications. 

The device makes the rumored iPhone Fingerprint Scanner look like a skeleton key :P I just ordered one and am pretty excited about this disruptive entrant to the security and password space. 

Read more on BetaKit.com: http://www.betakit.com/unlock-your-smartphone-with-heart-nymi/

(via evolar)

Parable of the Stones by Steve Jobs

"What I’ve always felt that a team of people doing something they really believe in is like is like when I was a young kid there was a widowed man that lived up the street. He was in his eighties. He was a little scary looking. And I got to know him a little bit. I think he may have paid me to mow his lawn or something.

And one day he said to me, “come on into my garage I want to show you something.” And he pulled out this dusty old rock tumbler. It was a motor and a coffee can and a little band between them. And he said, “come on with me.” We went out into the back and we got just some rocks. Some regular old ugly rocks. And we put them in the can with a little bit of liquid and little bit of grit powder, and we closed the can up and he turned this motor on and he said, “come back tomorrow.”

And this can was making a racket as the stones went around.

And I came back the next day, and we opened the can. And we took out these amazingly beautiful polished rocks. The same common stones that had gone in, through rubbing against each other like this (clapping his hands), creating a little bit of friction, creating a little bit of noise, had come out these beautiful polished rocks.

That’s always been in my mind my metaphor for a team working really hard on something they’re passionate about. It’s that through the team, through that group of incredibly talented people bumping up against each other, having arguments, having fights sometimes, making some noise, and working together they polish each other and they polish the ideas, and what comes out are these really beautiful stones.”

Computer Vision Reveals The Remarkable Secret of Flocking | MIT Technology Review

(Source: emergentfutures)

5 Ways To Use Video Collaboration For Effective Learning

(Source: gjmueller)

unconsumption:


A sustainability-minded competition challenged students at Parsons The New School for Design to transform Poltrona Frau‘s leather leftovers–freshly harvested from the floor of its factory in Tolentino, Italy–into luxe accessories and objects. Designer and Parsons faculty member Andrea Ruggiero led a group of 15 Parsons product design students in the seven-week project.
Jenny Hsu emerged on top with “Piqnique” (at left), a woven case for meals on the go that doubles as a leather placemat. Rounding out the top three were Yuna Kim‘s “Miovino” leather wine glass tags and the “Tuft” candle holders (at right) designed by Benjamin Billick.

More: Parsons Students Repurpose Luxe Leather Scraps for ‘Wasteless’ Competition - UnBeige

unconsumption:

A sustainability-minded competition challenged students at Parsons The New School for Design to transform Poltrona Frau‘s leather leftovers–freshly harvested from the floor of its factory in Tolentino, Italy–into luxe accessories and objects. Designer and Parsons faculty member Andrea Ruggiero led a group of 15 Parsons product design students in the seven-week project.

Jenny Hsu emerged on top with “Piqnique” (at left), a woven case for meals on the go that doubles as a leather placemat. Rounding out the top three were Yuna Kim‘s “Miovino” leather wine glass tags and the “Tuft” candle holders (at right) designed by Benjamin Billick.

More: Parsons Students Repurpose Luxe Leather Scraps for ‘Wasteless’ Competition - UnBeige

Why collaboration is vital to creating effective schools

Recent research examining efforts to enhance collaboration in districts and schools strongly indicates that purposefully building trust works. Studies by the Consortium on Chicago School Research and the National Center for Educational Achievement (a division of the firm that develops the ACT college admission tests) bear this out, as do the examples of the Cincinnati, Union City, New Jersey, and Springfield, Massachusetts public school districts. The weight of this accumulating evidence suggests that it is time to reverse course from the ineffective reliance on the coercive “sticks” that have dominated education policymaking to a new set of approaches that would promote effective teamwork and intensively collaborative practices.

(Source: gjmueller)

world-shaker:

7 Good Virtual Tours for Students
So many great resources in here. This is one I’m toying around with now:

The Google Art Project uses Street View technology to take you inside dozens of famous museums. An extension of this is Hangout Quest on Google+. Hangout Quest is a game that allows you to go on a virtual scavenger hunt inside the Palace of Versailles. The object of the scavenger hunt is to find artwork and other objects in the palace. If you invite others to your Hangout you can compete against them in a race to find the objects first. Hangout Quest uses the Street View imagery of Google Maps to bring you inside the Palace of Versailles. Another cool piece of technology added to Hangout Quest is facial tracking. The facial tracking technology allows you to move around in the Palace of Versailles by just moving your head instead of clicking around with your mouse.

world-shaker:

7 Good Virtual Tours for Students

So many great resources in here. This is one I’m toying around with now:

The Google Art Project uses Street View technology to take you inside dozens of famous museums. An extension of this is Hangout Quest on Google+. Hangout Quest is a game that allows you to go on a virtual scavenger hunt inside the Palace of Versailles. The object of the scavenger hunt is to find artwork and other objects in the palace. If you invite others to your Hangout you can compete against them in a race to find the objects first. Hangout Quest uses the Street View imagery of Google Maps to bring you inside the Palace of Versailles. Another cool piece of technology added to Hangout Quest is facial tracking. The facial tracking technology allows you to move around in the Palace of Versailles by just moving your head instead of clicking around with your mouse.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)